The new oil from algae process


#1

I would love to hear more about this oil from algae process in the 1.2 formula, if that information can be shared.

How does this process compare in terms of cost to other types of oil? How can it be expected to fare over time by that same standard? Is this process already in use and producing oil for other purposes? Or is it a new thing?


#2

Algae omega 3 has been around a long time… I was under the impression that it was pretty pricey as it was a niche item, but it seems they’ve found a cost effective solution… they may well wind up helping to put the fish oil DHA market out of business if they can help algae omega 3 producers scale.


#3

Maybe it always was cheap, and we have just been ripped off ala “hippy tax”.


#4

Does anyone know if the algal oil is safe from ATCV-1?


#5

I remember browsing at the chemist after work and noticed that Deva vegan omega 3 from algal oil was extremely expensive. One small bottle was around $60. However, this is not due to production processes. It is simply because this product is a niche product marketed not to price conscious customers but to customers willing to pay high premiums.

Algal oil omega 3 is actually more efficient than fish oil. Fish get their omega 3 by consuming algae. Humans catch the fish and then extract the omega 3 from the fish before bottling it. It is far more efficient to cut out the middleman (or middlefish) and simply extract the omega 3 from the algae directly.

Algal oil is also safer because algae is grown on land under controlled conditions. Omega 3 from fish oil or even algae from the sea is contiminated by refuse from ships and industrial waste such as mercury. Most fish oil companies claim to test their fish oil capsules, but it’s safer to just go with algal oil.


#6

I had read about that same thing shortly before coming here and finding out that Soylent was going to use algal oil from here forward.

It’s certain alarming, but I figure I’ve consumed enough algal products already that chances seem pretty good that if food is a vector, I’m already infected.


#7

Im curious if this new oil is the beginning of a greater shift towards algae. Rob has mentioned testing out algal protein and also the tremendous inefficiency of agriculture in comparison to algae. It looks like by mixing strains you can get a good ratio of amino acids and also algal carbohydrates.


#8

From manufacturing POV it’s tremendous benefit to food companies.
Researches of algae fuel / oil / food were active primarily during high oil prices. We are in the relatively cheap oil phase, but thankfully many studies have started in 2007-2013.

As I see from sources there are numerous competing technologies and industrial processes of production, extraction, and efficient nutrition of algae in factories.

I still don’t see any signs of unified and optimal production in the next 10 years, because each commercial and pre-commercial producer enjoys its unique situation (free factory space, free funding from specific grant, easy to get filtered wastewater, relatively cheap CO2, etc.)

It’s definitely future, but it reminds me the state where wind and solar energy was 15 years ago with 0.1% share of energy market with totally different approaches and methods. It will take us till end of next decade, when we will see algae factories of commercial size raising in different countries using same optimal technology.
Till then it’s highly fueled by research money, excessive funding, and local preferable conditions - all of what is not sustainable in long run and not even close to be self sufficient if left alone on fair and equal play-field.