Want to be sponsored by Soylent?


#42

While we do actively look at all sponsorship requests we ultimately have a finite budget. Lots of really cool things come across our plate that we have to pass on.


#43

I got a message that Lona is a dozen days from lift-off, as it could be called! I look forward to finding out how the preparation and use of Soylent on the trail goes for her. I wonder if she has acclimated herself to Soylent already, as starting on Soylent on the trail would be like starting a PCT hike with new boots, and everyone knows what happened to Cheryl Strayed with her new boots!

I have been drooling over backpack gear on Amazon myself. I have a pack and tent already, but they are from before the lighter spirit that is currently fashionable and I think I would buy new stuff for a new trip. I would like to go on a Soylent-only trip (plus gear, of course).


#44

You DEIFINTELY want to get lighter gear if what you have is old. For those of us past our 20s (and 30s and…), it is basically essential, and they make gear incredibly light these days. But it’s expensive.


#45

Lona started her first day today. Day 1


#46

I have been very inspired by Lona’s trek, though she has only left one message on the trail so far. I have begun planning my own trip, though who knows if it will really happen.

I have been busily looking at trail gear. I think I wouldn’t leave until next year, in April or May. Since I have already done Campo to Mt. San Jacinto (in the snow, in January, alone) I would probably take the terrifying vertiginous tram to the top of San Jacinto and begin there, at Little Roundtop campground, I think it is called… For food, I would bring Soylent and nothing else; thus, no cooking equipment.

A lot of the gear people take seems unnecessarily expensive. My trip would definitely be budget style, and as ultralite as possible.


#47

I wish I could give you an extra like for using the word ‘vertiginous’.


#48

Valve News Network (on youtube) has been looking for sponsors lately, and he seems like he fits what RL’s looking for. Looks like the easiest way to contact him would be VNNAdds@gmail.com.


#49

Lona has paused her trip, probably until next year. Details on her site, link above.


#50

So, I am heading out on the Pacific Crest Trail next weekend. I’m not sure I need sponsoring, although I would be open to that. I’ve already thru hiked the Appalachian Trail (2009), the John Muir Trail(2014). I hiked about 350 miles on the SoCal PCT in 2015, and will be returning this year to do the whole thing. It should be an interesting time, given this year’s snowpack.

I’m shooting to have a base pack weight under 12 lbs. I also think I will skip cooking this time around, and had been thinking recently about soylent. I usually bring multivitamins with me to supplement my backcountry food, but it would be nice to know that whatever food I eat in the backcountry is nutritionally balanced to start. Dry weight is a big consideration. I have no interest in carrying food with excess water weight. In the High Sierra, compactness is also a factor. I’ll need to have my food in an approved bear canister, if I can fit over 10 days of food in a Bearikade Weekender (10.5 L volume), then I’d be golden.

I’ve put on some extra weight, with the idea that I would go ketotic during long hiking days on the trail. Would Soylent fit in well with this strategy? During the day, I might supplement the primary meals with things like unsugared dried mango, seeds, and nuts.

tl;dr I wouldn’t mind being sponsored, but if that’s not an option, I’d be interested in advice, and whether it would be possible to get enough in powder form, logistically, to use for the whole thru hike. If so, I could just have it sent to me at my resupply points, where I could pick it up quickly and head back out.


#51

I’m not sure about sponsorship, since they were basically burned by Lona last year. You should try Soylent powder and see what you think. Soylent bars will probably be issued “soon” also, and most of us liked them when they tried an earlier version.

You need to figure out your basic caloric requirement and see if powder will work for you. I would do it, but I am used to Soylent. You could easily have Soylent shipped to supply points; even without planning, you could get away with changing the supply address a short time before it was scheduled to ship, just by modifying the address via the internet, assuming you had decent internet access.

I would forget about going “ketotic”. You can use your nuts and seeds to supplement your Soylent.

You should post info about your adventures somewhere. It sounds exciting!


#52

YES! PLEASE! When are the damn bars going to be made again?


#53

Revealingly, Lona has deleted her site, so I’d guess she has abandoned her dream of hiking the PCT.


#54

I’ve been doing that for a while now. Just Soylent powder, and I’ll also throw in some energy bars and/or homemade “trail mix” for snacks. Not even any coffee, haha. Works great! (once in a while I will bring my Jetboil, only because warm food is helpful on cold treks, like when I got snowed in on Mt. Robson)

I’m not an ultralight guy, but that’s probably mostly due to me having no issues living here in the mountains with my Gregory Baltoro pack loaded down with about 40lbs (includes 3L of water when camelbak is full). I ain’t that old but I don’t remember my 30s very well any more, either. lol

Regardless, if it works for you & you’re comfortable throughout, then that’s what you should be doing. :tent:


#55

Hello,

I know I am re-igniting an old thread but I’m very interested in getting sponsorship for my robotics team from soylent. During build season for the robots we are just so busy we don’t have time for meals and end up the skipping them.


#56

What will the robots be doing, if they are aiding in over throwing humanity, let me know so I can fast track a sponsorship.


#57

Here’s a current mock-up of our design. Let me know if you’re interested. World Destroyer v0.4