Will Soylent ship to Managua, Nicaragua? PLEASE


#1

I’ve been 100% soylent for over a year, and love it. THANK YOU. It’s solved all my nutrition concerns and it’s freed up my time & mental energy to focus on the other myriad details of life.

Now I’m considering moving to Nicaragua to have a house near the beach. Nicaragua because it’s slowly becoming the new Costa Rica, and the cost of living is fantastic.

As I researched how to forward my Soylent there, the best price I could get for shipping through UPS is $265. DHL and FedEx charge over $900 to ship a one month supply of V 1.9. Can soylent please ship to the capital of Nicaragua?

Please, dear Soylent, recall the ad you made that shows a Shipwrecked man getting Soylent delivered to him. I know that ad was not meant to be taken literally, but please! Some of us truly do want to live on the ocean far away from the chaos of the USA, and all we’d need beyond that is Soylent to keep us alive & thriving.


#2

I saw warnings within the last day or two that said that because of unrest, Nicaragua was not safe.

When I lived in Russia, I had essential medicines sent to me by a small shipper. If I were you, I would look for a discussion group of Nicaraguan expats and see what they recommend. I’m sure that there must be discussion groups of people who have direct experience with this problem.

Soylent is great, but I think you might be stuck with real food in Nicaragua.


#3

Thank you for your input. Can you please cite some sources about hearing about unrest in Nicaragua? Is it not safe? I was assured that it has become increasingly safe over the years. P.S. Gran Pacifica in Nicaragua is an American expat/retirement gated, guarded community on 2500 acres at the Pacific coast. I’ve been assured that it’s safe.


This is all I want! :sun_with_face:


#4

“With Death in Streets, Nicaragua Cancels Social Security Revamp”

From the NY Times, April 22.

From the State Department, I think:

Reconsider travel to Nicaragua due to crime and civil unrest.

On April 23, 2018, the U.S. government ordered the departure of U.S. government family members and authorized the departure of U.S. government personnel.

Political rallies and demonstrations are occurring daily, often with little notice or predictability. Some protests result in injuries and deaths.

I personally don’t trust information coming from the US gov’t these days, but this sounds reliable.

Costa Rica sounds safer to me.


#6

From the current Atlantic Monthly site. This is only the beginning of an article.

Nicaragua is showing all the symptoms of a failed state. At the center of the storm is the corrupt minority government of Daniel Ortega, the former revolutionary leader who now acts more like a cartel boss than a president. Over the past seven weeks, Ortega’s police and paramilitaries have killed more than 120 people, mostly students and other young protesters who are demanding the president’s ouster and a return to democracy, according to a human-rights group. Police hunt students like enemy combatants. Sandinista Youth paramilitaries, armed and paid by Ortega’s party, drive around in pickup trucks attacking protesters. Gangs of masked men loot and burn shops with impunity. Cops wear civilian clothing, and some paramilitaries dress in police uniforms. “This is starting to look more like Syria than Caracas,” one Nicaraguan business leader told me.